KNOWLEDGE BASE

Two Oregon men under age 21 have lodged complains with state authorities after area retailers refused to sell them ammunition and firearms due to store policy.

The men, Hayden Parsons, 20, and Jackson Starrett, 19, filed complaints with the Oregon Bureau of Labor and Industries’ Civil Rights Division, saying that Bi-Mart and Fred Meyer, respectively, refused to sell them guns and ammo due to their age. In each case, the men said they were told they were denied their sale over company policies refusing to transfer any firearm or ammunition to adults under age 21. Parsons sought to buy rifle ammunition and was turned away while Starrett sought to purchase a rifle.

Citibank announced this week it will cut ties with partnering businesses unwilling to adopt new policies for selling firearms.

Dealers large and small wishing to do business with Citi must place age restrictions on gun sales, ban bump stocks and high capacity magazines and refuse to complete transactions when buyers fail background checks, Executive Vice President Ed Skylar, of Citi’s Global Public Affairs, said Thursday.

“It is not centered on an ideological mission to rid the world of firearms. That is not what we seek,” he said in a blog post on the company’s website. “There are millions of Americans who use firearms for recreational and other legitimate purposes, and we respect their Constitutional right to do so. But we want to do our part as a company to prevent firearms from getting into the wrong hands.”

Sturm, Ruger & Company executives told shareholders Monday they do not and cannot support “stripping” gun rights away from millions of Americans “due to the evil actions of a small number of criminals.” That’s how the Connecticut company concluded their letter after receiving a questionnaire by BlackRock Inc, the world’s largest money manager with some $1.7 trillion in active funds, and as investment firms and banks review their relationships with the gun industry.

Influenced by the activism of students and victims after last month’s school shooting in Parkland, Florida, BlackRock said it wanted to provide more information to clients so they could make investments in line with their social values. The investment company asked publicly traded gun companies about their policies and practices so it could better understand the risks involved in the business.

Remington Outdoor Company updated a restructuring support agreement with lenders this week, putting the gun giant days away from filing for bankruptcy protections.

In Monday’s agreement, Remington laid out a timeline that set March 18 as the deadline to file a case in federal bankruptcy court. With Chapter 11 protections, the company would continue operating while negotiating with creditors and the court to restructure its nearly $1 billion debt load.

Remington named the newly formed Ankura Trust Company as an administrative agent, a role that manages payments and communications between the borrower and lender. Ankura, which formed in January, specializes in working with companies in “distressed and default situations.”

Daniel Defense dropped support for the bipartisan Fix NICS bill pending in the U.S. Senate after social media users threatened to boycott the company.

Even though the measure had already been endorsed by leading gun rights groups and the White House, the company’s owner, Marty Daniel, said on Monday that he was wrong to support the bill and cannot “in good conscience” support it any longer.

“I released the original statement because I believed it was the best option available at this time to hold back the continued attacks on the Second Amendment and the erosion of our rights,” he said in a message posted on the company’s Facebook page.

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